DELTAMARIN slashes conceptual design time from weeks to days with PLM solutions from IBM and Dassault Systèmes

Published on 17-Dec-2008

Customer:
Deltamarin

Industry:
Ship Building

Deployment country:
Finland

Overview

DELTAMARIN, a global marine consulting, design and engineering specialist with headquarters in Finland, is poised to capitalize on this changing marketplace. With more than 400 employees and 2007 turnover of €32 million, DELTAMARIN is shifting much of its labor intensive detailed design work to partners in East Europe, China and India, where costs are lower, and focusing its Finnish operations on the value-added areas of conceptual and basic design.

Business need:
The shipbuilding industry has seen significant changes over the past few years. Orders are at record highs with healthy backlogs of projects, but increased competition for materials and machinery has cut profits. To increase profitably, shipyards are focusing on time and cost reductions and are taking on a changing role – they are transitioning from design-build to a design-assemble business.

Solution:
PLM solutions from IBM and Dassault Systèmes offer DELTAMARIN the ability to handle 3D conceptual configurations and combine critical features of designs using parameterization to meet its customers’ needs.

Results:
With CATIA, we have completely reinvented a conceptual design for a cruise ship client, something that would ordinarily take three to five weeks, in just over 24 hours.

Benefits:
With CATIA, DELTAMARIN can generate multiple design alternatives quickly, knowing that each will meet strict rules, requirements and best practices in the industry, offering real advantages to its customers.

Case Study

Changing marketplace poses challenges

The shipbuilding industry has seen significant changes over the past few years. Orders are at record highs with healthy backlogs of projects, but increased competition for materials and machinery has cut profits. To increase profitably, shipyards are focusing on time and cost reductions and are taking on a changing role – they are transitioning from design-build to a design-assemble business, where they rely more and more on suppliers to provide technical expertise and to deliver pre-assembled components. Yards also are more reliant on owners and marine consultants to determine initial design parameters.

As owners increase their focus on safety, environmental impacts and minimizing lifecycle costs, such as crew, maintenance and energy, conceptual design is quickly being recognized as the single most important stage where long-term costs and revenues are determined. Conceptual design alternatives give ship owners or fleet operators an early view of the performance and financial trade-offs of different designs.

PLM offers DELTAMARIN a world of possibilities
DELTAMARIN, a global marine consulting, design and engineering specialist with headquarters in Finland, is poised to capitalize on this changing marketplace. With more than 400 employees and 2007 turnover of €32 million, DELTAMARIN is shifting much of its labor intensive detailed design work to partners in East Europe, China and India, where costs are lower, and focusing its Finnish operations on the value-added areas of conceptual and basic design.
With the diverse range of 3D modeling capabilities of IBM-DS PLM solutions, including CATIA, DELTAMARIN can offer its customers an unprecedented level of design prowess, speed and versatility to meet the industry’s evolving safety, decision support and lifecycle management requirements. Although shipbuilders have long employed 3D modeling in production, DELTAMARIN is driving design change within the industry by bringing the technology to the conceptual and basic design stages of shipbuilding.

"With CATIA, we have completely reinvented a conceptual design for a cruise ship client, somthing that would ordinarily take three to five weeks, in just over 24 hours." Markku Kanerva, Director, Marketing and Sales, DELTAMARIN

Safety regulations are changing and in particular ‘Safe Return to Port’ requirements coming into effect in 2010 are impacting new cruise ship and ferry designs. As DELTAMARIN moves to meet its clients’ needs, its Marketing and Sales Director Markku Kanerva says the company is adopting risk-based design techniques that allow it to offer a range of design alternatives with better functionality that still meet current and pending safety regulations.

“3D modeling with CATIA makes it very easy to present design options to owners, because changes are quickly seen and realized,” Kanerva says. “With its parametric modeling capabilities, CATIA allows us to combine critical features of each design in 3D in the most efficient way, giving our customers a single model to consider as early in the design process as possible to address functional and safety requirements.”

Although some other modeling systems have parameterization capabilities, he says, they are not practical and effective, particularly for conceptual design work. CATIA’s flexibility and ease of use, however, has already allowed DELTAMARINto wow its clients.

A cruise ship owner already well down the conceptual design road decided it wanted to make significant changes to its overall concept, Kanerva says. Luckily it was one of the first projects on which DELTAMARIN had chosen to do everything with CATIA 3D modeling.
“We collected all of the ideas during a meeting on Monday and by Wednesday morning presented the new model and general arrangement (GA) to the owners,” says Kanerva. “The owners’ senior VP said that in his 30 years with the company, he’d never seen anything like it. Normally developing a new GA would take from three to five weeks to complete, so it shows you where we stand with CATIA at our disposal.”

Greater visibility builds better ships
Looming changes have propelled safety and ‘green’ operations to top priorities for ship owners. CATIA’s 3D visualization tools, however, make meeting new and existing regulations, like ‘Safe Return to Port’ easier.

“You can see what systems are lost across the whole vessel and what types of functions remain online when you lose a space to flooding or fire, for instance,” Kanerva says. “And that is certainly not the situation with Failure Mode & Effective Criticality Analysis or FMECA modeling, the current regulatory prescribed option.”

Owners, he says, also complain that FMECA files are ‘dead’ and cannot be used in training, commissioning and operation of a vessel. CATIA, on the other hand, they say, offers the kind of detailed 3D models that can be used in decision support and as a lifecycle management tool to both operate and maintain vessels.

DELTAMARIN is also in the early stages of applying CATIA modeling techniques to better coordinate the design and phasing of individual ship sections built by independent subcontractors, reducing both time and cost by ensuring upfront compatibility. In addition, the company is applying CATIA’s finite element analysis tools early in the design stage – well before a contract is signed – to reduce risks, better define prices and ultimately yield a better final product.

In addition, DELTAMARIN is using IBM Tivoli to install all of its PCs, including CATIA workstations, and relies on IBM’s DB2 database as part of its brand new ENOVIA V5 environment.
With PLM solutions from IBM and Dassault Systèmes, DELTAMARIN is single-handedly revolutionizing conceptual and basic ship design in an industry undergoing significant change.

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© Dassault Systèmes 1994-2008. All Rights Reserved. Licensed Materials – Property of Dassault Systèmes.

Products and services used

IBM products and services that were used in this case study.

Software:
CATIA V5, ENOVIA V5 VPM, Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution, DB2 Enterprise Server Edition