How can you reimagine creativity?

Tribeca Presents

Storytellers with Watson: A Competition for Innovation
Sponsored by IBM

You are an artist.

You are an innate storyteller.

You use your art to motivate, amplify, and express.

What if you could leverage cognitive technology to help in the creative process? How might you change your industry? What might you create?

Push the boundaries of creativity, with Watson.

Tribeca Film Festival and IBM invite you on a journey around augmented intelligence and creativity through Storytellers with Watson: A Competition for Innovation.

  1. First, start learning about Watson.
  2. Next, think about how Watson could help change your profession.
  3. Get inspired. Read and listen to stories of artists and makers who have worked with Watson.
  4. Submit a form and create a short video by May 18 to share who you are, and your idea about how Watson could help you be a better creator.

Judges from Tribeca Enterprises and IBM will evaluate submissions and select up to 5 finalists to travel to NYC to workshop their ideas. Finalists will have an opportunity to pitch their idea to a panel of top leaders from IBM and Tribeca Enterprises, including acclaimed film and TV producer Paula Weinstein, Executive VP of Tribeca Enterprises. The grand prize winner will be invited with a guest to Tribeca 2018.

Subject to: Storytellers with Watson contest rules

Start by watching a quick video introduction, “How does Watson work?”

So, what could Watson do for your profession? There are many applications...

Development

Production teams can spark their development stage by working with
Watson to get ideas and inspiration
from all types of information.

Pre-Production

Budgets, locations, actors,
lighting, sets... so many
decisions, so little time. Watson can help scale expertise and help teams get quick advice.

Production and Post-Production

From shooting, to editing, to
adding music tracks and special
effects; Watson can help
producers save time and money.

Audience Experience and Interaction

Bots are intelligent helpers and
when built with Watson can turn
script dialogue into conversations
with viewers.

Marketing and Distribution

Marketing teams can work with
Watson to better know, target and
retain audiences.

And many more...

Look at how artists and makers
are making a difference with Watson...

Musicians discover hidden patterns

Grammy award winning music producer Alex da Kid collaborated with Watson to create the first “cognitive song.” Watson analyzed five years of natural language texts from sources as diverse as social media, The New York Times, United States Supreme Court rulings, and lyrics to more than 26,000 Billboard Hot 100 hits to discover hidden patterns in song structure and human emotion. The result was the creation of “Not Easy,” the first song of its kind. Learn More

More on hidden patterns:
Watson and cyber security
Watson and a Brooklyn R&B group

Designers analyze years of trends

High-end women’s wear brand Marchesa developed a cognitive dress with Watson that was featured at the Met Gala. Watson ranked images of 200 Marchesa gowns by color, design, and how many times they were photographed, in order to choose a style that portrayed the perfect combination for their brand. Through several Watson APIs and innovative ideas from the Marchesa design team, the dress analyzes real-time social sentiment in the room and on Twitter and responds by changing features of the dress into patterns of light. Learn More

More on design:
Art with Watson
Watson and Melbourne Fashion Week

Filmmakers identify emotional moments

In fall 2016, 20th Century Fox released the first-ever AI-generated movie trailer. Traditionally, it can take film editors and marketers up to a month to create trailers for an upcoming film. With Watson, they did it in days for the horror movie Morgan. Watson consumed visuals, audio and scene compositions from 100 horror movie trailers, then ran an analysis on Morgan to identify the 10 most relevant scenes for promoting the movie for its trailer. Learn More

More on visual recognition:
Watson at the Masters
Watson and the Oscars

Chefs pair unexpected food elements

IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to create Chef Watson, a cookbook that features original recipes developed by world class chefs and Watson. Watson, through its deep understanding of food chemistry science and the psychology of taste, analyzed thousands of recipes and ingredients identifying underlying patterns not seen by humans, to enable chefs to unleash their creativity. Learn More

More on cooking with Watson:
Watson and Nunu Chocolates

Gamers tap cognition

Students at Connally High School grew their knowledge of game design with the help of IBM Watson. IBM developers, who helped the students integrate IBM Watson into a “Medical Minecraft” game, embraced a new approach to game-based learning. The project has become a terrific introduction to cognitive computing through gameplay. It is an example of how a cognitive game can drive learning and engagement with even the most disadvantaged learners. The success of the project supported creation of the Computer Science Academy of Innovation at Connally High School. Learn More

More on education:
Watson and Sesame Street
More on gaming:
Watson and PlayFab
Watson and game development
IBM Speech Sandbox

Look at how artists and makers
are making a difference with Watson...

Musicians discover hidden patterns

Grammy award winning music producer Alex da Kid collaborated with Watson to create the first “cognitive song.” Watson analyzed five years of natural language texts from sources as diverse as social media, The New York Times, United States Supreme Court rulings, and lyrics to more than 26,000 Billboard Hot 100 hits to discover hidden patterns in song structure and human emotion. The result was the creation of “Not Easy,” the first song of its kind. Learn More

More on hidden patterns:
Watson and cyber security
Watson and a Brooklyn R&B group

Designers analyze years of trends

High-end women’s wear brand Marchesa developed a cognitive dress with Watson that was featured at the Met Gala. Watson ranked images of 200 Marchesa gowns by color, design, and how many times they were photographed, in order to choose a style that portrayed the perfect combination for their brand. Through several Watson APIs and innovative ideas from the Marchesa design team, the dress analyzes real-time social sentiment in the room and on Twitter and responds by changing features of the dress into patterns of light. Learn More

More on design:
Art with Watson
Watson and Melbourne Fashion Week

Filmmakers identify emotional moments

In fall 2016, 20th Century Fox released the first-ever AI-generated movie trailer. Traditionally, it can take film editors and marketers up to a month to create trailers for an upcoming film. With Watson, they did it in days for the horror movie Morgan. Watson consumed visuals, audio and scene compositions from 100 horror movie trailers, then ran an analysis on Morgan to identify the 10 most relevant scenes for promoting the movie for its trailer. Learn More

More on visual recognition:
Watson at the Masters
Watson and the Oscars

Chefs pair unexpected food elements

IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to create Chef Watson, a cookbook that features original recipes developed by world class chefs and Watson. Watson, through its deep understanding of food chemistry science and the psychology of taste, analyzed thousands of recipes and ingredients identifying underlying patterns not seen by humans, to enable chefs to unleash their creativity. Learn More

More on cooking with Watson:
Watson and Nunu Chocolates

Gamers tap cognition

Students at Connally High School grew their knowledge of game design with the help of IBM Watson. IBM developers, who helped the students integrate IBM Watson into a “Medical Minecraft” game, embraced a new approach to game-based learning. The project has become a terrific introduction to cognitive computing through gameplay. It is an example of how a cognitive game can drive learning and engagement with even the most disadvantaged learners. The success of the project supported creation of the Computer Science Academy of Innovation at Connally High School. Learn More

More on education:
Watson and Sesame Street
More on gaming:
Watson and PlayFab
Watson and game development
IBM Speech Sandbox

Explore the Watson products that made these collaborations come to life.

Have more questions about Watson or the contest?
Email us at sweeps@leaddogmarketing.com to ask our experts.

Watson FAQ

1) What is Watson?

Watson is a cognitive computing technology that can think and learn like a human. With Watson, you can analyze and interpret all of your data, including unstructured documents (like emails, social media posts, images, videos and documents).

Watson isn't programmed like other computers. It can form hypotheses, and tell you how confident it is in its recommendations so people can make better decisions that lead to better outcomes. It can ingest huge amounts of information, and it learns each time you interact with it, building expertise over time, just like humans. By providing “Augmented Intelligence” Watson works with humans to enhance their expertise.

2) What is cognitive computing?

Cognitive computing offers fundamental differences in how systems are built and interact with humans. Cognitive systems, such as IBM Watson, are able to build knowledge and learn, understand natural language, and reason and interact more naturally with human beings than traditional systems. They are also able to put content into context with confidence-weighted responses and supporting evidence.

Cognitive systems can quickly identify new patterns and insights. Over time, they will simulate even more closely how the brain actually works. In doing so, they could help us solve the world’s most complex problems by penetrating the complexity of big data and exploiting the power of natural language processing and machine learning.

Cognitive computing has quickly emerged as a transformative technology that enables businesses to gain competitive advantage, creators to reinvent how they create, marketers to personalize and improve customer engagement, and researchers to identify new life-saving medical treatments. The potential of what you can do with a cognitive technology like Watson is boundless.

3) Do I have to be a programmer to use Watson?

There are lots of ways to interact with Watson. As with anything that you do (like making films) you have skills and tools. And hopefully those tools help you do more with your own skills.

Here are three examples:

  1. Training Watson: we've mentioned that Watson needs to be trained. When you are training Watson you are building a corpus of information (“Corpus” is Latin for “body”.) A corpus is all of the writings or works on a particular subject. So if you are training Watson, you need to be a subject matter expert on the information used to train Watson.
  2. Building an application (an app): Watson is set up as a series of services, or APIs (application programming interfaces) available on the IBM Cloud. If you want to put Watson services into an app you are building (for example, a chat bot) you need to learn how to make API calls from your application.
  3. Using a Watson app: This is the really cool part. As we mentioned earlier on of the characteristics of a cognitive computing system is that they interact with humans naturally. Because of this, anyone can interact with a Watson app using natural language texts or conversation. In fact, in the majority of interactions with Watson, the end user wouldn't "see" Watson. They would just think they are talking to the bank or the insurance company, or their lawyer or doctor.

4) How is Watson different from a Siri or Alexa?

One way that Watson is unique compared to other AI companies, is that most competitors came from a consumer standpoint, or a search or commerce standpoint, but Watson is designed around data that doesn't live on the internet. Watson can handle information that comes in any form, a lot of it unstructured like photographs, medical images, videos, web pages or even the body of emails. Another way is that Watson is able to assess information in context. For example: You might ask Watson 'who was the first president of the US'? The answer would be 'George Washington'. Then you can ask Watson, "When was he born?" Because Watson knows the context of 'he' being George Washington in your conversation, he would be able to answer which a simpler type of processing can't do. Whereas some apps can take structured data and look up the answers to questions, Watson is capable of learning and coming up with answers - or recommendations - itself. From the beginning, Watson was built for business. We want to help all kinds of companies drive real business value though our Watson APIs and solutions.

5) What is an API?

API stands for Application Programming Interface. APIs are sets of rules and protocols that serve as “building blocks” for programmers. They determine how different systems will interact. Programmers then put these blocks together to make a scalable, cohesive system. For example, there are apps that show the user what the traffic is like on a route from point A to point B. An API is used to pull that traffic data onto the map based app.

6) Where does Watson live?

Watson lives in the cloud. This means that you can access Watson APIs from any computer or mobile device. By integrating Watson APIs, you can build cognition into your own apps or products.

7) What can I do with Watson?

There are so many things you can do with Watson! There are about 50 underlying technologies that have a huge array of capabilities. Popular APIs include, personality insights, tone and sentiment analyzers, vision, speech-to-text and text-to-speech, natural language classifier, discovery service and more. To learn more about these, visit https://www.ibm.com/watson/developercloud/services-catalog.html

8) How do I get started with Watson?

Hands-on experience with some of these technologies is a great place to start!

Ready to start building your own cognitive solution? Learn more about Watson’s suite of APIs and sign up for a free trial here: https://www.ibm.com/watson/developercloud/

Whether you are a filmmaker, musician, game developer, or something in between, with Watson, you can reimagine your craft.