Most Influential Paper

Most Influential Paper

Wang Chen, Giuliano Antoniol, Foutse Khomh, Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc, Dorina Petriu
(Other winners: Kamel Ayari, Massimiliano Di Penta)

Is it a Bug or an Enhancement? A Text-based Approach to Classify Change Requests

The Most Influential Paper from CASCON 2008 is awarded to Giuliano Antoniol, Kamel Ayari, Massimiliano Di Penta, Foutse Khomh and Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc for their paper, "Is it a Bug or an Enhancement? A Text-based Approach to Classify Change Requests".



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Congratulations to the Authors!

Giuliano Antoniol

Polytechnique de Montréals

Winner's Testimonial

N/As

Giuliano Antoniol is a professor of Software Engineering in the Department of Computer and Software Engineering of the Polytechnique de Montréals where he directs the SOCCER laboratory. He worked in private companies, research institutions and universities. In 2005 he was awarded the Canada Research Chair Tier I in Software Change and Evolution. He has served in the program, organization and steering committees of numerous IEEE and ACM sponsored international conferences and workshops. His research interest includes software traceability, traceability recovery and maintenance, software evolution, empirical software engineering, search-based software engineering, and software testing.


Kamel Ayari

Polytechnique de Montréal at the time

Winner's Testimonial

N/As


Massimiliano Di Penta

University of Sannio

Winner's Testimonial

N/As


Foutse Khomh

Université de Montréal at the time

Winner's Testimonial

I am honoured to receive this award and happy to see that our work has had some impact on software engineering research. Thank you to my co-authors Giulio, Kamel, Max, and Yann-Gaël for making this happen. This paper was my first CASCON paper and just the second paper that I submitted to a conference in my career, which makes this award even more special for me.

Foutse Khomh is an associate professor at Polytechnique Montréal, where he heads the SWAT Lab on software analytics and cloud engineering research (http://swat.polymtl.ca/). He received a Ph.D. in Software Engineering from the University of Montreal in 2010. His research interests include software maintenance and evolution, cloud engineering, service-centric software engineering, empirical software engineering, and software analytic. He has published over 125 conferences and journals papers. His work has received two ten-year Most Influential Paper (MIP) Awards, and four Best/Distinguished Paper Awards. He has served on the program committees of several international conferences including ICSM(E), SANER, MSR, ICPC, SCAM, ESEM and has reviewed for top international journals such as SQJ, JSS, EMSE, TSE, and TOSEM. He is program chair for Satellite Events at SANER 2015, program co-chair of SCAM 2015, ICSME 2018, and ICPC 2019, and general chair of ICPC 2018. He is one of the organizers of the RELENG workshop series (http://releng.polymtl.ca) and Associate Editor for IEEE Software.


Yann-Gaël Guéhéneuc

Université de Montréal at the time

Winner's Testimonial

I am honoured to receive this award along with my colleagues Giulio, Max, Foutse. This work would not have been possible without KamelĂ­s work, who was M.Sc. student at the time. To all, our colleagues, readers, and CASCON community, I give my thanks for this award. I still recall that one of my very first papers was published at CASCON in 2004 and that, since then, CASCON has always held a special place in my heart. With this paper we showed that not all bug reports are equal and propose the first approach to classify bug reports between ĂŹtrueĂź bugs and enhancements, thus increasing the quality of any subsequent bug prediction models. This work was used in many subsequent works and replicated few years later to the benefit of bug prediction models and their users.

Yann-GaÎl GuÈhÈneuc is full professor at the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering of Concordia University since 2017, where he leads the Ptidej team on evaluating and enhancing the quality of the software systems, focusing on the Internet of Things and researching new theories, methods, and tools to understand, evaluate, and improve the development, release, testing, and security of such systems. Prior, he was faculty member at Polytechnique MontrÈal and UniversitÈ de MontrÈal, where he started as assistant professor in 2003. In 2014, he was awarded the NSERC Research Chair Tier II on Patterns in Mixed-language Systems. In 2013-2014, he visited KAIST, Yonsei U., and Seoul National University, in Korea, as well as the National Institute of Informatics, in Japan, during his sabbatical year. In 2010, he became IEEE Senior Member. In 2009, he obtained the NSERC Research Chair Tier II on Software Patterns and Patterns of Software. In 2003, he received a Ph.D. in Software Engineering from University of Nantes, France, under Professor Pierre Cointe's supervision. His Ph.D. thesis was funded by Object Technology International, Inc. (now IBM Ottawa Labs.), where he worked in 1999 and 2000. In 1998, he graduated as engineer from 
cole des Mines of Nantes. His research interests are program understanding and program quality, in particular through the use and the identification of recurring patterns. He was the first to use explanation-based constraint programming in the context of software engineering to identify occurrences of patterns. He is interested also in empirical software engineering; he uses eye-trackers to understand and to develop theories about program comprehension. He has published papers in international conferences and journals, including IEEE TSE, Springer EMSE, ACM/IEEE ICSE, IEEE ICSME, and IEEE SANER. He was the program co-chair and general chair of several events, including IEEE SANER'15, APSEC'14, and IEEE ICSM'13.