Use Rational Performance Tester to monitor Collaborative Lifecycle Management server resources

White paper


Abstract

Using IBM Rational Performance Tester V8.5 to resource monitor an IBM Rational Colleaborative Lifecycle Manager V4.0.3 server hosted on IBM WebSphere Application Server V8.5.5.

Content

Author: Dayal Sachdev



Table of Contents:





Introduction


Administrators play a role in businesses. With newer technologies on the horizon, administrators must find ways to maintain and adapt applications for maximum uptime. There are several tools available today to monitor the servers on which the applications are hosted. However, you must determine which solution is more appropriate for your business requirements. IBM Jazz administrators face many challenges with determining which hardware architecture is sufficient to serve their business. How can you properly size an environment to serve out a certain number of users? While there is no easy answer to that question, it is up to the administrator to monitor the server and take a suitable course of action. This white paper describes one approach to monitoring a server layer and captures those results for analysis using Resource Monitoring with IBM Rational Performance Tester using this architectural environment:

  • Rational Collaborative Lifecycle Management (CLM) V4.0.3
  • Rational Performance Tester (RPT) V8.5
  • WebSphere Application Server V8.5.5
  • Apache Derby
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2


There will be a focus on monitoring WebSphere Performance Monitoring Infrastructure (PMI) resources on this environment. WebSphere Application Server collects performance data and provides interfaces so external applications can monitor that performance data. To help identify performance problems and help tune an environment that runs web applications, data is collected through PMI. PMI is the underlying framework in WebSphere Application Server that gathers performance data from various runtime resources, such as Java™ Virtual Machine (JVM), thread pools, and application components like servlets and Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) components. This white paper assumes you have a general knowledge of load testing concepts and Jazz tools. It does not cover customizing a performance test for multiple Jazz environments.






Overview


This white papers walks you through the administrative steps from start to finish on Resource Monitoring a Jazz CLM V4.0.3 server hosted on WebSphere Application Server V8.5.5. This activity consists of these task items:

  • Create a HTTP recording of a core functionality on your Jazz server
  • Create a schedule and associate your performance test to it
  • Enable Resource Monitoring in the schedule
  • Configure Resource Monitoring to WebSphere PMI counters
  • Run Performance Schedule with 5 users and analyze results






Topic 2 Create a HTTP recording of a core functionality on your Jazz server


When starting a new recording in RPT,a wizard appears. In this step, choose a HTTP test to record the interaction with a web based application. In this case it is the Jazz CLM V4.0.3 server. You can leave the encryption level to “None” if you are not recording any sensitive data.




You then place this new recording in the tests folder of the performance test project. Give it an applicable name and click Next.




You are given the option to select a browser to choose from to begin the recording. For the purpose of this white paper, choose Microsoft Internet Explorer 9. It falls under the supported list of client browsers for Jazz V4.0.3 applications as specified in this Jazz.net article:

https://jazz.net/wiki/bin/view/Deployment/CLMSystemRequirements403





Once you click Finish, the browser session begins and the recording starts.

Once the browser is up, you notice the annotation toolbar appear on the top of the browser and the RPT HTTP Test Recording screen. You need to enter a URL to get started. Enter the CLM V4.0.3 server URL to begin capturing the server data.




Now that you have entered the server URL, the login screen loads. You also notice the annotation toolbar activity around the packets increasing during the recording. This tells you that data is being captured between the client browser and the server.






Enter your user credentials as it will be stored in the test. You are now logged in and taken to your project dashboard, which in this case is the sample JKE Banking project for Quality Management.




In this example, you record the HTTP transaction where you are capturing the list of test cases in the JKE Banking project area by navigating through the Construction tab and selecting Test Cases. This launches a query within the Rational Quality Manager (RQM) project area to collect the total list of test cases. You might have project areas where there are hundreds or thousands of test cases. When this query is executed, it allocates memory depending on its size. You can stop the recording at this point to capture the login page of the CLM server, JKE Banking Quality Management project dashboard, and execution of the list of test cases query.








Create a Schedule and Associate your Performance Test to it


In this screen capture, you have created a schedule that is the “engine” that runs a test. It can be as simple as 1 virtual user running 1 test or hundreds of virtual users in different groups, each running different tests at different times. This schedule consists of 5 users from 1 user group running 1 test. This essentially allows you to emulate 5 users running the performance test when the schedule is executed.








Enable Resource Monitoring in Schedule


You now proceed with enabling resource monitoring from the RPT schedule. This in essence allows you to capture data, such as processor or memory usage, while running a test schedule and provide a comprehensive view of a system under test to aid in problem determination.





You now check the box Enable resource monitoring and click Add to monitor the suitable technology. In this case, it is the WebSphere Application Server.








Configure Resource Monitoring to WebSphere PMI Counters


Here you add the WebSphere PMI data source and name it "WAS855" to reflect the appropriate application server. You check the box Administrative security enabled to reflect the application server settings. In this example, the server is hosted on the same system as RPT and the system is set to resolve to this host name. In a real world environment, you must enter a fully qualified domain name or IP address of the system hosting WebSphere Application Server. You must also have the Rational Agent Controller installed on that machine to allow for communication between RPT and the server host.




Here you are prompted to enter the user credentials for accessing the WebSphere Application Server before you can see a list of counters to choose from on the WebSphere PMI Monitoring component.




On the Resource tab, you select the type of data to capture. The tree view in the next screen capture shows the application server and its counter groups and counters. You monitor a counter group in this case. Selecting all possible resource data requires substantial amounts of memory. You can also hold your mouse pointer over a counter to see details about what that counter measures.




You select the jvmRuntimeModule counter group which consists of these counters:

  • HeapSize
  • ProcessCpuUsage
  • UpTime
  • UsedMemory


After enabling this counter group for resource monitoring in the schedule, you are able to monitor values of the different counters during and after the execution of the schedule. As you increase the user load to emulate a larger user base accessing the CLM V4.0.3 server, you can monitor its impact on WebSphere Application Server V8.5.5. This helps you to determine if any course of action is required from the operating level or application level. For example: If the schedule reports are showing maximum heap size being reached with a certain number of users, next steps might be to add additional CPU or memory hardware on the server to support that user base.




It is also recommended to add a datapool to a schedule, especially when recording dataset where user authentication is entered. It provides variable test data to tests during execution. Test data like input and output data is stored in a datapool and substituted in the test during execution. In the next screen shot, you substitute the user login data to access the CLM V4.0.3 server with values in the datapool fields to ensure that the metrics reported contain more realistic data. This is instead of cached data that would be encountered upon logging onto the CLM server, accessing the dashboard, or opening the list of test cases using the same user multiple times.








Run Performance Schedule with 5 users, Analyze Results


You can view real-time reporting data while the schedule is executing using the Resources tab in the Performance report or after the schedule is complete. Each graph in the report infrastructure has been enhanced to allow resource data to be placed over the already rendered graphs. For more details on this, see the “Customizing reports and overlaying counters” section in this article:

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/07/0417_patel/

The report data in the next screen captures show you that there were some peaks during the 5 user schedule execution for the UsedMemory and ProcessCpuUsage counters while UpTime and HeapSize remained stagnant. This tells you that WebSphere Application Server had slight peaks in its JVM while 5 users were performing the actions surrounding logging into RQM, accessing the RQM JKE Banking dashboard, and running the list test cases query from that project. As you gradually increase the user load, you can better grasp the WebSphere server utilization and take the suitable course of action.










Notes and warnings


It is not recommended to implement this practice into a production environment as it can have a major impact on your business.






References


This content was used in reference or as other sources of information:






Disclaimer

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE EFFORTS WERE MADE TO VERIFY THE COMPLETENESS AND ACCURACY OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, IT IS PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. IN ADDITION, THIS INFORMATION IS BASED ON IBM’S CURRENT PRODUCT PLANS AND STRATEGY, WHICH ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BY IBM WITHOUT NOTICE. IBM SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF, OR OTHERWISE RELATED TO, THIS DOCUMENT OR ANY OTHER DOCUMENTATION. NOTHING CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT IS INTENDED TO, NOR SHALL HAVE THE EFFECT OF, CREATING ANY WARRANTIES OR REDOCUMENTS FROM IBM (OR ITS SUPPLIERS OR LICENSORS), OR ALTERING THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF ANY AGREEMENT OR LICENSE GOVERNING THE USE OF IBM PRODUCTS OR SOFTWARE.


Original publication date

2013/9/24

Cross reference information
Segment Product Component Platform Version Edition
Software Development Rational Team Concert Team Server Windows 4.0.3
Software Development Rational Quality Manager Team Server Windows 4.0.3
Software Development Rational Requirements Composer Team Server Windows 4.0.3
Application Servers WebSphere Application Server PMI/Performance Tools Windows 8.5.5

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Document information


More support for:

Rational Performance Tester
Integrations: IBM

Software version:

8.5

Operating system(s):

Windows

Reference #:

7039566

Modified date:

2013-09-25

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