Halifax International Airport Authority

Helping keep air travel on schedule with enterprise asset management

Published on 16-Oct-2012

"We spoke with a lot of other airports and it became very clear that IBM Maximo was the market leader from an airport maintenance perspective. We then selected the edi solution based on IBM Maximo because of edi’s strength in the airport industry and their approach." - —Mike Maxwell, Director of Information Technology, Halifax International Airport Authority

Customer:
Halifax International Airport Authority

Industry:
Travel & Transportation

Deployment country:
Canada

Solution:
Asset Management, Smarter Planet

Smarter Planet:
Smarter Transportation

IBM Business Partner:
edi

Overview

At Halifax International Airport Authority (HIAA), a comprehensive enterprise asset management program is helping the organization predict and prevent maintenance issues that could affect operations at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. By centralizing monitoring, management and reporting of the airport’s critical assets, the HIAA expects to dramatically improve the ratio of corrective-to-preventive maintenance—from 90 percent corrective and 10 percent preventive to 20 percent corrective and 80 percent preventive—even as the airport grows.

Business need:
When one of its equipment failures drew media attention, the HIAA decided that it needed a more reliable, automated and analytical way to track its thousands of assets, from emergency generators to airfield lighting to baggage systems and vehicle fleets, and maintain them preventively.

Solution:
To more proactively manage assets and airport operations, the HIAA implemented a powerful enterprise asset management solution developed by IBM Business Partner edi and based on IBM® Maximo® Asset Management software. When the airport service center, which is open or on call 24 hours a day, receives work requests, the system automatically dispatches work orders to the necessary personnel and alerts staff when repairs aren’t completed within a specified time. Operational personnel can log vital information on maintenance work and safety inspections for assets across the airport facilities.

Benefits:
Reduced the percentage of corrective maintenance being done on assets from 80 percent to only 10 percent; Increased the number of work orders the service department could handle from 450 to 1,000, a 55 percent increase; Helped the airport better prepare for weather events and track costs more effectively; Improved the depth and accuracy of regulatory reporting

Case Study

Smart is...Predicting and preventing asset problems before air travelers are affected.

At Halifax International Airport Authority (HIAA), a comprehensive enterprise asset management program is helping the organization predict and prevent maintenance issues that could affect operations at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. By centralizing monitoring, management and reporting of the airport’s critical assets, the HIAA expects to dramatically improve the ratio of corrective-to-preventive maintenance—from 90 percent corrective and 10 percent preventive to 20 percent corrective and 80 percent preventive—even as the airport grows.

While minor operational issues can be problematic for many companies, for some organizations a minor hiccup can set off a large-scale and very visible issue. It was a lesson that Mike Maxwell, director of Information Technology, learned his first week on the job at Halifax International Airport Authority (HIAA).

HIAA manages the operations and maintenance for Halifax Stanfield International Airport. Located on Canada’s Atlantic coast, Halifax Stanfield International Airport serves 3.6 million passengers annually and is internationally recognized for its customer service. In fact, the airport has been rated the Best Airport in the World in its class for seven of the past eight years and certified as Airport Service Quality Assured—an industry benchmark of service excellence.

In 2006, when Maxwell joined HIAA, the authority was transitioning to a “common-use” airport model in which the authority maintained ownership and oversight of airport equipment, and the airlines paid a fee for these services. The authority hired Maxwell to build the organization’s capabilities, especially in the area of service and asset management, and, during his first week at HIAA, he saw firsthand the effects of a minor operational issue.

“We had a brief service interruption due to an equipment problem, and CTV [Canadian Television Network] showed up to cover the story,” says Maxwell. “Imagine, having the media on your door when you’re having a bad day. As we transitioned to a common-use airport, we wanted the ability to predict problems before travelers were affected.”

Greater visibility, control and automation

The authority’s first step was the creation of its Airport Service Center, which provides a single contact point for all work requests. The service center is staffed 20 hours a day, with personnel on call during the remaining four hours.

Next, HIAA implemented a powerful enterprise asset management system that could automate processes and help staff increase the ratio of preventive-to-corrective maintenance.

“Over the years, we have received numerous service quality awards,” says Maxwell. “We were doing a tremendous job in operating the airport, but a lot of it was done through manual, ad-hoc processes, and we were growing every year. We knew that to keep up with the growth, we needed the tools that would help us not only track our assets and work orders, but also become more proactive versus reactive. Our goal is to move from a 90:10 ratio of corrective-to-preventive maintenance to a 20:80 ratio.”

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Smarter Transportation: Improving efficiency and service with predictive maintenance

  • Instrumented: Maintenance and asset data is captured in a single asset management database to help staff manage assets, their conditions and work processes.
  • Interconnected: Extensive cost tracking enables staff to evaluate purchase decisions for new equipment based on the total cost of ownership rather than just purchase price.
  • Intelligent: A comprehensive view into the historical and near real-time performance of assets enables staff to identify trends and repair equipment before it breaks.

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The edi Strategic Airport Asset Manager (eSAAM) solution, based on IBM® Maximo® Asset Management software, was selected to support this effort.

“We [airport authorities] spend a lot of time comparing notes,” says Maxwell. “When we were looking at asset management solutions, we spoke with a lot of other airports and it became very clear that IBM Maximo was the market leader from an airport maintenance perspective. We then selected the edi solution based on IBM Maximo because of edi’s strength in the airport industry and their approach. They worked with us on the business process mapping and design, and involved all our stakeholders in understanding how we can map these processes in IBM Maximo.”

As work requests are input from the Airport Service Center, the system automatically dispatches the work order to the necessary personnel and alerts staff when repairs aren’t completed within a specified time. Operational personnel can enter into the system all maintenance work and safety inspections for assets, such as emergency power generators, airfield lighting systems, baggage systems and common-use terminal equipment. Information from other third party applications, such as the airport fuel dispensing system, is automatically brought into IBM Maximo software, enabling the system to generate preventive maintenance requests for vehicles based on usage.

New insights improve efficiency

With information now consolidated in a single system, operational staff can analyze the data to identify trends.

“We can do a lot more reporting on how we are doing as an organization,” says Maxwell. “What assets are working well for us? Which assets need attention? What are our buying decisions going to be? What improvements can we make that will reduce the fees we charge? How much do we need to budget for a snow event? We can leverage this information so that we can become even more of a value-added provider. For example, a higher upfront cost for a particular asset may be justified, because the total cost of ownership with maintenance is actually lower than other options.”

Faster access to information also streamlines compliance reporting.

“Our airfield electricians check the operation of the airfield lights daily,” says Maxwell. “But, because before the records were kept in disparate systems, it was time-consuming to collect all the documents needed for regulatory requests. Now, we can easily run a report to demonstrate that this work was completed and the associated observations.”

Predicting problems before they affect travelers

Most importantly, according to Maxwell, the data will help service management staff predict and respond to potential issues before travelers are affected.

“We can analyze the data and begin to see trends and repair equipment before it breaks,” says Maxwell. “For example, if we see that we’ve had a failure of one of the control units for the majority of our passenger loading bridges, we can replace those units on the remaining loading bridges to prevent the issue from occurring in the first place. The data will also help us predict our resource needs for any given process so we know how much time the repair will take and how many people need to be dispatched.”

The inside story: Getting there

The project has been driven by both IT and Operations.

“Our senior manager of Airport Facilities and Airside Services and I have spent a lot of time in airports to determine what we need to focus on,” says Maxwell. “He understands what it takes to maintain, repair and operate the equipment. And I’m there to apply best practices for project management and business analytics, and deliver the technology solutions that will help us be successful.”

Success also required strong buy-in at every level of the organization.

“A main focus was how the system was going to be adopted into our corporate culture and into our operations,” he explains. “We spent a lot of time talking to people and conducting one-on-ones on how the system works and why it is important. This groundwork enabled us to gain the buy-in not only from our management but also our teams on the front line.”

Solution components

Software
● IBM® Maximo® Asset Management

IBM Business Partner
● edi

For more information

To learn more about how IBM can help you transform your business, please contact your IBM sales representative or IBM Business Partner.

Visit us at: ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/maximo-asset-mgmt

For more information about edi, visit: www.edatai.com
For more information about the Halifax International Airport Authority, visit: www.hiaa.ca

Products and services used

IBM products and services that were used in this case study.

Software:
Maximo Asset Management

Legal Information

© Copyright IBM Corporation 2012 IBM Corporation Software Group Route 100 Somers, NY 10589 Produced in the United States of America October 2012 IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, Maximo, and Tivoli are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the web at “Copyright and trademark information” at ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml This document is current as of the initial date of publication and may be changed by IBM at any time. Not all offerings are available in every country in which IBM operates. The performance data and client examples cited are presented for illustrative purposes only. Actual performance results may vary depending on specific configurations and operating conditions. It is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any other products or programs with IBM products and programs. THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND ANY WARRANTY OR CONDITION OF NON-INFRINGEMENT. IBM products are warranted according to the terms and conditions of the agreements under which they are provided. TIC14256-USEN-00