Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital

Published on 24-Oct-2011

Validated on 04 Jun 2013

Customer:
Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital

Industry:
Healthcare

Deployment country:
Taiwan

Solution:
Collaborative Lifecycle Management, Enterprise Modernization, Cloud & Service Management, Optimizing IT, Server Consolidation, Service Management, Smarter Planet, Systems & Network Management

Smarter Planet:
Smarter Healthcare

Overview

Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital (Shin Kong Hospital) is a leading medical center in Taiwan. Since the hospital formally opened in 1992, the approximately 1,000-bed facility has grown to 35 departments and provides a full range of medical, surgical, imaging and health management services. With approximately 2,000 employees, Shin Kong Hospital each year handles more than 1 million outpatient treatment visits, nearly 30,000 inpatient stays and 75,000 emergency room visits.

Business need:
This forward-thinking 1,000-bed hospital was founded in 1992 using technologies that were current at the time. Patient records were largely paper-based, while a number of automated functions were developed and delivered via green screen interface. Scattered throughout the hospital’s network were several critical applications, including its initial Hospital Information System, picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and radiology information system. The introduction of single-payer national health insurance in 1995 changed the game for the hospital.

Solution:
In the face of changing standards and moving targets for funding, the hospital determined it could deliver the biggest impact to the bottom line and quality care by focusing its optimization efforts on resource utilization, electronic health records and drug prescribing methods. Creating an Executive Information System (EIS) and a Quality Indicator System (QIS), the organization gained a holistic view of hospital operations and was able to receive new insights into performance in real time, enabling rapid course correction.

Benefits:
· Increased revenue 5 percent each month over prior year; increased bed utilization rate from 70 percent to 92 percent · Significantly reduced incidents of erroneous medication prescribing and other forms of under- or over-treatment · Eliminated the need for duplicate examinations when patients were transferred from one department to another

Case Study

Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital (Shin Kong Hospital) is a leading medical center in Taiwan. Since the hospital formally opened in 1992, the approximately 1,000-bed facility has grown to 35 departments and provides a full range of medical, surgical, imaging and health management services. With approximately 2,000 employees, Shin Kong Hospital each year handles more than 1 million outpatient treatment visits, nearly 30,000 inpatient stays and 75,000 emergency room visits.

The Opportunity
This forward-thinking 1,000-bed hospital was founded in 1992 using technologies that were current at the time. Patient records were largely paper-based, while a number of automated functions were developed and delivered via green screen interface. Scattered throughout the hospital’s network were several critical applications, including its initial Hospital Information System, picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and radiology information system. The introduction of single-payer national health insurance in 1995 changed the game for the hospital. As the national insurance program’s funding rules and incentives continued to evolve, the organization sought a way to flexibly satisfy the regulators, streamline its healthcare delivery with leading-edge technologies and best practices and develop new ways to increase revenue.

What Makes It Smarter
In the face of changing standards and moving targets for funding, the hospital determined it could deliver the biggest impact to the bottom line and quality care by focusing its optimization efforts on resource utilization, electronic health records and drug prescribing methods. Creating an Executive Information System (EIS) and a Quality Indicator System (QIS), the organization gained a holistic view of hospital operations and was able to receive new insights into performance in real time, enabling rapid course correction. Analytics helped keep the hospital on course to meet quality standards, with alerts linked to patients’ electronic medical records. Contributing to the increased revenue was continuous feedback received from the EIS regarding bed availability, which enabled units to repurpose unused beds for waiting patients.

Real Business Results
· Increased revenue 5 percent each month over prior year; increased bed utilization rate from 70 percent to 92 percent
· Significantly reduced incidents of erroneous medication prescribing and other forms of under- or over-treatment
· Eliminated the need for duplicate examinations when patients were transferred from one department to another

For more information
Please contact your IBM sales representative or IBM Business Partner. Visit us at: ibm.com/healthcare

To learn more about Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital visit: www.skh.org.tw/SKHenglish%20website/index.htm

Products and services used

IBM products and services that were used in this case study.

Hardware:
Power 520 Express, Power Systems running AIX 6

Software:
Rational Team Concert Express, Tivoli Storage Manager Extended Edition, WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment, Rational Developer for System z, DB2 for Linux, UNIX and Windows, Tivoli Storage Manager for Databases

Service:
ISSC - Lab Services

Legal Information

© Copyright IBM Corporation 2011 IBM Corporation 1 New Orchard Road Armonk, NY 10504 U.S.A. Produced in the United States October 2011 All Rights Reserved IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, CICS, DB2, Power, Rational, Rational Team Concert, System z and WebSphere are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at ÒCopyright and trademark informationÓ at ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml Other company, product or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. The information contained in this documentation is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this documentation, it is provided “as is” without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this documentation or any other documentation. Nothing contained in this documentation is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM (or its suppliers or licensors), or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software.