The Ottawa Hospital client reference video

Published on 22-May-2012

"I think introducing business process management into health care is going to change the world frankly. Being able to drive out the inefficiencies to free up clinicians to do the things they ought to be doing for the patients helps to provide better care." - Valerie Gamache-O’Leary, senior director and deputy CIO, The Ottawa Hospital

Customer:
The Ottawa Hospital

Industry:
Healthcare

Deployment country:
Canada

Solution:
Business Process Management (BPM), Cloud Computing, SmartCloud - Foundation, SmartCloud - Solutions

Overview

Formed in 1998 through the merger of five different health institutions, The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) is one of the largest academic teaching hospitals in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Business need:
The Ottawa Hospital vision statement was to be an academic center that was tops in the country leading in research and education. The hospital also wanted to improve its patient focus to improve patient care and safety.

Solution:
Using software from IBM, the hospital looked at best practices, and then modeled them to make its processes more predictable and usable.

Benefits:
The solution enables practitioners to spend more time focusing on the right things and less time focusing on the mechanics, the bureaucracy, the paperwork and other things. It enables practitioners to spend less time chasing information and more time dealing directly with the patients.

Video

Formed in 1998 through the merger of five different health institutions, The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) is one of the largest academic teaching hospitals in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.




Video Transcript


IBM Ottawa Hospital client reference

As Produced Transcript

Dr. Glen Geiger, chief medical information officer
Valerie Gamache-O’Leary, senior director and deputy CIO
Dr. Jack Kitts, president and CEO
Dale Potter, senior vice president & chief information officer

Dr. Glen Geiger: Occupancy in Canadian hospitals was always extremely high, so we typically run around 95 percent occupancy.

Valerie Gamache-O’Leary: The number of patients we are seeing is growing. The acuity of patients is growing quite frankly. They are sicker when they come; they need more attention; they need more care in the community after they leave the hospital.

Dr. Jack Kitts: We had overcrowding, patients in the hallway, high occupancy rates, that we felt led to a poorer patient experience, and probably less quality outcomes.

Dr. Jack Kitts: Our vision statement was to be an academic center that was tops in the country leading in research and education, and it was glaringly obvious at that time that we didn’t have a patient focus in our vision.

Dr. Glen Geiger: When the patients are not be able to flow through the hospital effectively and you could argue the patient is not receiving level of care we would like to deliver by making sure that there is space available for them at the appropriate level, at the appropriate time.

Dale Potter: Physicians and other health care providers are knowledge workers. We need to push them up the value chain so they are not doing low value activity like calling for consults or trying to negotiate an admission for a patient on another service with another physician. And they should really be focused on patient care and their clinical delivery of care.

Dr. Jack Kitts: And over the course of a few months, with a lot of engagement, we all agreed on a vision that we would aspire to provide each and every patient with the world class care, exceptional service and compassion that we would want for a loved one.

Dale Potter: So what we are doing is we’re following the patient, and we are modeling the process that’s relevant to them.

Dale Potter: And that’s what we are attempting to do here is to put process orchestration, process models in place so that literally, from a monitor, you can see the characteristics of the system; you can see that the flow in the ED is too fast to be taken up in the admitting units in the inpatient wards, how can you influence that.

Valerie Gamache-O’Leary: I think introducing Business Process Management into health care is going to change the world frankly. Being able to drive out the inefficiencies to free up clinicians to do the things they ought to be doing for the patients helps to provide better care.

Dale Potter: The concept is that we fill in using technology and tools the white space between the systems so that we can put markers in to know movement of a patient, critical events that need notification, bring in data where it’s required proactively.

Dale Potter: And using the IBM toolsets – Lombardi, Blueworks Live – and these other event engines, business rules engines, what we’re doing is we are drawing what people do naturally out of their heads, looking at best practices, trying to meld those together to be best practice and then model it and harden it so that it's predictable and usable.

Dale Potter: Process innovation is being able to introduce enablers like technology, like information, like other things into a process and make it more powerful, increase the capacity of a process and flexibility of a process.

Dr. Glen Geiger: I am going to spend more time focusing on the right things and less time focusing on the mechanics, the bureaucracy, the paperwork and other things. I am not spending time chasing information; I am spending time dealing directly with the patients.

Dr. Glen Geiger: The future of the Ottawa Hospital from my point of view it's going to involve leveraging this technology across the entire organization. Obviously, we’re starting small to begin with but I can easily see it's going to spread further and further and further.

Dr. Jack Kitts: What I would like to see, and I will retire a happy man, when every patient, every time, walks out of this hospital having been treated and says, they treated me like a loved one and I’ve had a very good outcome. That’s what this is all about.

Products and services used

IBM products and services that were used in this case study.

Software:
IBM Blueworks Live, IBM Business Process Manager Standard, WebSphere Operational Decision Management

Legal Information

© Copyright IBM Corporation 2012 IBM Corporation Software Group Route 100 Somers, NY 10589 U.S.A. Produced in the United States of America May 2012 IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, Blueworks Live and WebSphere are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the web at “Copyright and trademark information” at ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml This document is current as of the initial date of publication and may be changed by IBM at any time. Not all offerings are available in every country in which IBM operates. The client examples cited are presented for illustrative purposes only. Actual performance results may vary depending on specific configurations and operating conditions. THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS PROVIDED “AS IS” WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND ANY WARRANTY OR CONDITION OF NON-INFRINGEMENT. IBM products are warranted according to the terms and conditions of the agreements under which they are provided.